Yes! I have started my first set of seeds. Yes, I’m in zone 5a/b. No, I’m not crazy (as far as I know!). Here’s what I’ve started so far:

First sowing: 1/31/22

Veggies:

Leek, King Richard (organic)Johnny’s Seeds
Onion, Alisa Craig (yellow, bulb)Seed Savers Exchange
Onion, Sierra Blanca F1 (white, bulb)Johnny’s Seeds
Onion, Rossa di Milano (red, bulb)Johnny’s Seeds
Onion, Yellow of Parma (yellow, bulb)Baker Creek
Onion, Zebrune Shallot Baker Creek

I grew onions and leeks last year, mostly as starts from Dixondale Farms. Due to health reasons I didn’t get the starts put into the ground until very late, and that, plus our horribly hot, dry summer, made for a mediocre onion and leek crop. This year I’m not buying starts–I’m going to try to grow all of my alliums from seed. What I remember from the few alliums I did attempt to grow from seed last year is that they took a long time to get big enough to transplant out into the yard, so I’m starting really early. It’s not like they are going to take up a lot of space in my basement greenhouse even if they do get big, and they are pretty sturdy and easy to pot up, so I’m not worried about them getting damaged or rootbound. (Unlike tomatoes and tomatillos, which I’m not even going to think about sowing until at least late April.)

Flowers:

Sweet Pea, Bouquet Blend Botanical Interests
Sweet Pea, High Scent Botanical Interests
Sweet Pea, Knee-Hi Blend Botanical Interests
Sweet Pea, Little SweetheartBotanical Interests
Sweet Pea, Perfume Delight Botanical Interests
Lisianthus, Echo Double MixSeeds ‘n Such

Sweet peas are another plant that I started too late last year, and had very low germination rates and low success with those plants that did germinate. Everyone raves about how amazing they smell, so I am determined to be successful with mine this year. Unfortunately, the root trainer I ordered from Gardener’s Supply is unexpectedly running late (even through FedEx, not USPS) and so, after a day of soaking the seeds, I’ve had to temporarily store them in wet paper towels. If nothing else, this should help me find out which seeds are viable or not.

The lisianthus is, honestly, pretty much a crapshoot–the seed packet arrived smashed, with all of the pelleted coating broken off. As lisianthus are almost impossible to germinate and grow as it is, I will be pleasantly surprised if I get even one viable plant out of the 100 seeds I planted. But who knows? It may work.

I should be sowing my next set of seeds around mid-February, I think.

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